Gleb Kosorukov

glebGleb Kosorukov was born at a secret nuclear research centre in the Urals.
He graduated the MIFI in Moscow with a degree in nuclear physics. During the 90s he worked as photojournalist for the New York Times, The Guardian, Time and others, before shifting to arts and fashion photography.
Since 2000, Kosorukov has lived between Moscow and Paris.


This project is an allegorical illustration of Russia’s recent mass media campaign searching for a “national idea”: the creation not of ideology, but at least the mythology of a strong state, a collective national consciousness and traditional values.
In panoramic photographs we see processions much like the familiar Russian Easter parades, but this is a display of what might be regarded as Russian pride — spirituality, tradition, community, sporting achievement, weaponry. The procession leads through the ruins not of Grozny or Tskhinval, but, in fact, a huge glass factory that once produced glass for cars, planes, missiles and submarines — and even the Kremlin’s ruby stars and Lenin’s sarcophagus in the Mausoleum. At the beginning of new millennium, locals ripped the factory down for scrap metal literally with their bare hands. All the people photographed in the processions are real Cossacks, sportsmen, ex-bandits, families, local kids. The two last panoramas were shot after the August 2008 events in Tskhinval; they reflect similar processes taking place in neighboring ex-USSR states like Georgia and Ukraine.
The panoramic photographs are accompanied by objects resembling huge homemade “Icons”. The project also includes a 5’20” looped HD video installation and an hour-long performance, in which the author competes with a rival in disassembling and reassembling a Kalashnikov machinegun; a chess-clock is used to measure the timings (chess is a matter of national pride). The sound of the competition resembles a shooting spree when amplified and reverberated.